Young people at the heart of humanitarian action

22 May 16
Around the world International Nepal Sierra Leone


How Restless Development is making the case for young people to be at the heart of humanitarian action at the World Humanitarian Summit in Istanbul 23 - 24 May 2016.

What is the world humanitarian Summit?
why should young people be at the heart of humanitarian action?
What is restless development doing at the world humanitarian summit?
How did young people respond to ebola?
how did young people respond to the nepal earthquake?
Why is restless development getting involved in humanitarian response?

What is the world humanitarian Summit?

The first-ever World Humanitarian Summit, taking place in Istanbul on 23-24 May 2016, is a global call to action by United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon.

The Summit has three main goals:

  1. To re-inspire and reinvigorate a commitment to humanity and to the universality of humanitarian principles.
  2. To initiate a set of concrete actions and commitments aimed at enabling countries and communities to better prepare for and respond to crises, and be resilient to shocks, (around the five themes, below).
  3. To share best practices which can help save lives around the world, put affected people at the centre of humanitarian action, and alleviate suffering.

World Humanitarian Summit icons

Why Should young people be at the heart of humanitarian action?

Young people are affected by humanitarian crises, but can also lead resilience and response efforts. This is Restless Development's case for how to put young people at the heart of humanitarian action, you can download the briefing here or browse through it below:

 

What is restless development doing at the world humanitarian summit?

Restless Development, represented by staff from the international office in London and from Sierra Leone, will be making our case to world leaders and key people in humanitarian response, supporting the wider youth sector in the Major Group on Children and Youth, and co-hosting a side event that will feed into the Summit: “Young people at the heart of humanitarian action”

Read about what our young staff members will be doing direct from them in Augusta, Jack, and Princess’ blog.

Augusta Jack Miriam Princess at World Humanitarian Summit

Young people make up one third of people displaced by conflicts and disasters worldwide. Yet it would be wrong to paint a picture of young people as helpless victims. The reality is thatyoung women and men in countries all around the world are leading humanitarian action. We have witnessed it first hand both in Sierra Leone, where young people led the fightback against Ebola, and in Nepal, driving the country forwards in the wake of two devastating earthquakes.

How did young people respond to ebola?

More than 2,400 young volunteers reached almost 1.9 million people across Sierra Leone, educating community leaders and encouraging safe burial and fast reporting of Ebola cases. You can read more about how young Sierra Leoneans helped end the Ebola outbreak in Sierra Leone here.

 

how did young people respond to the nepal earthquake?

Post-earthquake, more than 500 community learning centres have been established by young people, reaching an estimated 168,651 children, 5,990 teachers and 43,875 women.
You can read more about how young Nepalis have dealt with the first year since the earthquake here

Why is restless development getting involved in humanitarian responses?

Young staff from 6 different countries picked these objects to represent the way they have personally seen young people respond to crisis. This is part of Restless Development’s new global strategy from 2016 - based on a Big Conversation with 5,000 people across the world as well as our 30 years of experience in youth-led development - which will have an explicit focus on young people building resilient and sustainable communities where the agency of young people and communities is at the heart of both preventing and solving arising challenges and emergencies.

In the immediate aftermath of the Nepal earthquake in April 2015, Restless Development’s young volunteers helped to set up and run Temporary Learning Centres where children could continue to learn and re-establish routines. Non-formal education, such as games, helped regain a sense of normality in the children’s lives - which was crucial to ensure they didn’t suffer mental trauma. Hand puppets in the form of soft toy animals were used with children to take their minds to a safe and happy environment.

We believe a clipboard is a physical object that does a great job representing how young people respond to crisis. Time and again you see large groups of young people being the physical responders – sharing important life-saving information, gathering data from the crisis affected zone, performing and tracking activities and materials and in the case of the Ebola crisis; working on developing and executing long-term action plans with communities for response. All of this information is recorded with the literal support of the simple but universally accessible and very useful clipboard.