Post-2015: Backing a Governance Goal

03 Feb 14



The process for deciding the next development goals is well under way. Restless Development has been strongly involved in the process, ensuring that youth voices are captured and incorporated into the post-2015 framework.

There have been strong calls across citizen consultations for the post-2015 goals to include a focus on governance - including our very own youth consultations in which governance was the number one priority (see Youth Voices on a post-2015 world).

We're excited to share a proposal from 50 CSOs from across the globe, including Restless Development, which was coordinated by the Transparency and Accountability Initiative. The proposal calls for a stand-alone goal on governance and outlines 5 key targets that should be included and integrated into the other goals.

Crucially these include enabling citizens to access detailed and reliable information on sustainable development, such as what resources are available and how they are spent, and supporting the participation for all people in the design, delivery and monitoring of policy, no matter who they are.

We believe that small gains in openness and accountability will enable citizens and institutions to better tackle development issues. In fact, we’re setting up a new project to enable young people in Ghana, Tanzania and Nepal to do just that!

Supporting a young person at the UN consultation on Governance

Check out ‘Governance and the post-2015 development framework: a civil society proposal’.

Restless Development representatives from the UK and India will be attending the 8th Open Working Group on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) meeting in New York in February 2014. This is a key opportunity to meet with civil society and member states to discuss these recommendations and to emphasize the role of youth in ensuring responsive and accountable governance.

By promoting openness, accountability and effective public institutions, the post-2015 framework could play a pivotal role in building trust between states and citizens, curbing corruption and waste and ultimately, maximising its effects on poverty and sustainable development.



A youth perspective: Rosemary Zulu, from Zambia, at the UN Consultation on Governance in February 2013, Johannesburg


Follow the discussions in New York via Twitter: @RestlessDev @VictoriaFors @RestlessBigIdea #OWG8 #post2015