15 communities in Tanzania benefit from our

08 Mar 12
Zimbabwe

Improving Life skills and livelihoods.

for youth in Mangwe, Zimbabwe.

 

Zimbabwe

‘The initiative is yielding good results as we only recorded 3 teenage

pregnancies in the last 10 months, compared to 33 during the same

period last year.’

Sr. Tsikira, Nurse at the Community Clinic

 

‘All the youth sessions facilitated by Restless Development were

effectiveand informative and as Matabeleland AIDS Council we would

love to continue working with you to educateand improve the lives of

young people in this community.’

Ms. Siziba

Programme Manager for Matabeleland AIDS Council

 

THE CHALLENGE
Young people in rural Zimbabwe have limited access to basic education and struggle to develop marketable personal and vocational skills. The education system is weak and combined with a lack of employment opportunities, this leaves young people without skills or resources to fulfill their potential and increasingly vulnerable to exploitative and risky relationships. Lack of hope and opportunity leads to high levels of school drop-out, teenage pregnancy, early marriage, HIV and substance abuse. As young people struggle to navigate the years between adolescence and adulthood, little guidance is available to them and they have difficulty generating enough income to take control of their lives and remain above the poverty line.

Tshitshi ward of Mangwe District, Matabeleland South is close to the borders with South Africa and Botswana, prompting many young people to illegally cross the borders in search of elusive jobs and livelihood opportunities. Often they are exploited and coerced into lives of crime, sex work and drugs.

THE INTERVENTION

Restless Development implemented a Youth Empowerment Programme in the area of livelihoods and health. We partnered with Matabeleland AIDS Council (MAC), to raise awareness of health issues through sporting events and carried out life skills guidance sessions. 

We established STAR (Societies Tackling AIDS through Rights) Circles and trained Volunteer Peer Educators (VPEs) to mobilise young people to participate. VPEs opened up debate around taboo issues such as sexual and reproductive health, and HIV positive speakers provided firsthand insights into the challenges they have faced. A youth-friendly resource centre was established at the local clinic. We ran career guidance sessions and invited speakers to relate their experiences of accessing the professions. We provided personalised support to help young people develop their career plans and pursue relevant education and training.

‘Exposure to career guidance and counseling session opened up a new world for me. I previously did not know that such opportunities existed and could be accessed by people like me in the rural areas.’

Lipha Ngwenya, now a student nurse at St Luke’s Brunapeg Nursing School

 

 

 

 

THE RESULTS
The initiative resulted in a marked decrease of teenage pregnancies from 33 in 2010 to 3 in 2011 reported at the local clinic. 580 young people visited the resource centre, and over 3,000 condoms and 1,000 female condoms were distributed, compared to zero in the previous year.Improved career guidance led to the following individual achievements:

  • 19 Out-of-school youth registered to rewrite their ‘O’ level examinations. A learning circle was established at the local school to provide resources and extra lessons.
  • 6 Out-of-school youth enrolled for a cutting and designing course (dress making) at St Francis Vocational Training Centre.
  • 2 Out-of-school youth with relevant qualifications were assisted to enroll for nurse training at St Anne’s Mission Hospital.
  • 1 young man was assisted in enrolling at the Bulawayo Poly Technical College and is now studying Machine Shop Engineering to become a qualified welder and fence maker in the community.

The initiative proves that by supporting youth to match their abilities to education and income-generation opportunities, it is possible to break the cycle of poverty in Mangwe, and for young people to enter formal employment.

Through doing so they gain an incentive to protect their health, an outcome which has been supported by the introduction of youth-friendly services and awareness-raising activities in the area.

The twenty-eight individuals who accessed education and training have become role models in their communities. They now serve as mentors to in-school youth and deliver presentations in schools and communities to encourage young people to follow their lead. They are a powerful demonstration that it is possible to tackle poverty in Mangwe, and a deterrent to young people considering the dangerous and illegal path of immigration to South Africa and Botswana.

   

 

INTERESTED IN LEARNING MORE?

Website: www.restlessdevelopment.org/zimbabwe

Email: infozimbabwe@restlessdevelopement.org